Here are some courses I have taught or will soon teach as the primary instructor.

Spring 2018

Introduction to Ethics (UConn Storrs)

The theme of this course is commodification. Students live in an increasingly market-centered world, even in their college lives. The aim of this class is to investigate the concept of commodification and explore the ethical implications of buying, selling, and commodifying. We will draw on a wide, diverse range of sources to adequately investigate the topic, but our primary text will be Elizabeth Anderson's Private Government. Students are encouraged to find topics relevant to their lived experience to analyze through the various theories.

Honors Introduction to Ethics (UConn Storrs)

The theme of this course is commodification. Students live in an increasingly market-centered world, even in their college lives. The aim of this class is to investigate the concept of commodification and explore the ethical implications of buying, selling, and commodifying. We will draw on a wide, diverse range of sources to adequately investigate the topic, but our primary text will be Elizabeth Anderson's Private Government.. Students are encouraged to find topics relevant to their lived experience to analyze through the various theories. As this is an honors class, it will be writing-intensive: students will write several short response papers throughout the semester as well as a substantial research paper.

Fall 2017

Philosophical Classics (UConn Hartford)

This course had two major goals: to introduce students to some classics of Western philosophy and to teach students how to read philosophical books. We focused on some classic works in early analytic philosophy:  Russell's Problems of Philosophy and Ayer's Language, Truth, and Logic.  

Summer 2016

Introduction to Ethics (UConn Storrs)

This course was offered in conjunction with UConn's Center for Academic Progress and Student Support Services. It was an intensive, five-week class designed for incoming freshmen, particularly from underserved communities in Connecticut. While the course did cover metaethical issues and surveyed normative theories, a large portion was focused on applied topics such as sexual consent, reparations for slavery, and drug legalization. A syllabus can be found here.